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COLORADO

     
 
 
  State population (2000 census)
4,301,261
 
     
 
 
  Population receiving a FM public radio signal
4,091,666
95.1%
  (from both in and out-of-state stations)    
  Population in uncovered areas
209,595
 
  Population receiving AM & FM public radio signal
597,589
95.3%
     
 
 
  Stations in State FM stations
25
 
    FM translators
78
 
    AM stations
3
 
     
 
 
  1989 PTFP Study: Population receiving a
 
 
    FM public radio signal   
2,550,000
88%
     
 
 

Broadcast Coverage Maps

FM Stations - Detail         FM Stations - Printable

AM Stations - Detail         AM Stations - Printable

Public Radio Stations in State

Main stations in bold followed by associated repeaters
Translators are shown at the end of the narrative
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters
Location in ( ) - actual location of transmitting facilities
N - New facility since 1989 study     # - Station now meets study criteria
[ ] - AM main station
FM Stations
KRZA
88.7
Alamosa [KCFR(AM) Denver]
(San Antonio Peak, NM)    KPRN N
89.5
Grand Junction
KAJX
91.5
Aspen    KPRH N
88.3
Montrose
KGNU
88.5
Boulder KDUR N
91.9
Durango
KDNK
90.5
Carbondale KRFC
88.9
Fort Collins
KRCC
91.5
Colorado Springs KAFM N
89.5
Grand Junction
   KRLJ N
89.1
La Junta KUNC
91.5
Greeley
KSJD N
91.5
Cortez KSUT
91.3
Ignacio
KBUT
90.3
Crested Butte KUTE N
90.1
Ignacio
KUVO
89.3
Denver KURA
98.9
Ouray
KVOD
90.1
Denver KVNF
90.9
Paonia
   KPRU N
103.3
Delta    KVMT N
89.1
Montrose
   KCFP N
91.9
Pueblo KOTO
91.7
Telluride
   KPRE N
89.9
Vail

AM Stations
KCFR N 1340 Denver KKPC N 1230 Pueblo
KCFC N 1490 Boulder

General Comments

Unlike most states, public radio in Colorado is delivered primarily by non-profit community organizations.  Fourteen community licensees operate public radio facilities in the state as do three universities, a local school board and a Native American tribal entity operates two public radio stations.  The largest broadcaster in the state is Colorado Public Radio (CPR), which operates a dual network of translators and repeaters that distribute programming from its main stations KVOD and KCFR(AM) in Denver to communities throughout the western slope and Colorado Plateau.  Twelve other public broadcasters in the state also operate translator networks in the state.  A list of the translators in the state appears at the end of this section.  Despite the geographic challenges of the Rocky Mountains and the vast sparsely populated plains region of eastern Colorado, all regional centers of commerce and population receive at least one public FM radio signal and in many cases more than one.  The state is also served by three public AM stations which are operated by CPR.  

FM Service

Colorado public radio stations have invested significantly in erecting new facilities to reach formerly uncovered areas of the state.  Fifteen stations were included in the 1989 PTFP study. Eleven new stations and 53 translators have been constructed in the state since that time.  A significant amount of this investment has occurred in communities on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains and further west on the Colorado Plateau.  Three new stations, KPRU, KPRE, and KPRH, were built by CPR, and new stations KSJD, KAFM, KUTE, and KVMT were built by other broadcasters. Most of these stations cover areas identified as unserved in 1989.  CPR also constructed KCFP and KRLJ to extend service in the southeast part of the state.  KRFC is a new station that provides additional services in northern Colorado.   Some of the translators in the state have been built through public and private initiatives that are not directly part of the public broadcasting industry.   Pitkin and Lake counties in the Rocky Mountains have county offices that operate and maintain translators to distribute public and commercial broadcast services to residents.  Private enterprises have done the same in the Rocky Mountains, the Colorado Plateau and Colorado's eastern plains.   KVOD and KUVO, in partnership with KRMA, a channel 6 public television in Denver, are building a new tower that will enable both FM stations to broadcast at full power, increasing their coverage. CPR is installing a new station in Glenwood Springs, KVOV, during the summer of 2004.  This is part of a larger transmission project with KAJX Aspen and KDNK Carbondale to improve the coverage provided by all three broadcasters.

The percentage of Colorado's population receiving a signal has increased from 88% in 1989 to 95.1% currently.  The total number of residents not receiving a public radio signal has been reduced from 340,000 in 1989 to 216,491.

AM Service  

CPR operates three AM stations in the state. All began broadcasting after the release of the 1989 PTFP study.  KCFC 1490 kHz Boulder operates at 0.87 kW during both daytime and nighttime hours.  KCFR 1340 kHz Denver operates at 1 kW during both daytime and nighttime hours.  KKPC 1230 kHz Pueblo operates at 1 kW during both daytime and nighttime hours.  The AM stations provide a news and information program service which is also broadcast on CPR's FM stations KPRN Grand Junction and KPRH Montrose.

Service from Adjacent and Other States

KANZ Garden City, Kansas, operates a translator at Lamar in Prowers County on the Kansas‑Colorado border which rebroadcasts KANZ’s main signal from Garden City. WWFM, a broadcast service of Mercer County Community College in Trenton, New Jersey, operates a translator that serves the Roaring Fork River Valley, which include the communities of Aspen and Snowmass. It also has its programming delivered to other western slope communities including Steamboat Springs through agreements with local translator operators. Nebraska Public Radio Network stations KPNE North Platte and KTNE Alliance broadcast signals that reach residents across the Nebraska‑Colorado border.  WRUW Laramie's signal reaches residents across the Wyoming-Colorado border as do the signals of KSJE Farmington and KCIE Dulce across the New Mexico‑Colorado border. 

Unserved Areas

The unserved areas of Colorado are either vast and remote from populated areas as is the case on its eastern plain and in northwest Colorado, or isolated and remote as in the Rocky Mountains and on the Colorado Plateau of far western Colorado.  In 19 of the 61 counties in Colorado, less than 40% of the residents can receive a public radio signal.  On average, 9.3% of the populations in those counties are able to receive a signal.  Terrain, remoteness, low population density and financial infeasibility combine to create high barriers against extending public radio service to the unserved areas of the state.

Region A  

Public radio service in the northwest corner of the state is provided by translators serving the local population centers.  Moffat and Rio Blanco counties contain less than 2,000 unserved people. CPR will be constructing a new station in Moffat County in the northwest corner of the state  This station, KPYR, will replace their translator K211BS, which is being bumped off that frequency by a new station.  Only half the population of Routt County receives public radio, leaving 9,800 people without service.  Most of Grand County, some 12,000 people, are without public radio service.

Region B  

Much of the eastern quarter of the state is unserved.  The population is extremely sparse.  On Colorado's eastern border with Kansas, Kit Carson and Cheyenne counties‑with a combined population of 10,242‑do not receive any public radio signal from any source.  In the few communities of size, service is provided by translators.  To the east of Greeley and Denver, Morgan County has the largest unserved population in the region, however, with over 25,000 people without public radio service.  

Region C 

Following the Continental Divide northward, Mineral County has no public radio service for its 831 inhabitants.  There is very scattered service for the central part of the state encompassing the Rocky Mountains.  Conejos County, with a population of 8,400, is traversed by the Continental Divide and is one of the counties with no public radio service in the state. Several of the counties in this region have significant unserved populations -- including Saguache (4,600 people), Rio Grande (6,000 people), Alamosa (12,400 people) and Park (11,000 people).  These sparsely populated counties, far from population centers and isolated by terrain, typify the difficulty that remains in extending public radio service to the remainder of Colorado's unserved residents.

Region D

The southeast portion of the southern border is rural and unserved.  In Las Animas County, 9,521 residents do not receive a public radio signal.  In Baca County, 4,500 people do not receive public radio.

Translators listed by operating station
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters

KAJX Aspen, CO K280DZ5 N
103.9
Leadville
K215BC1 
90.9
Aspen K218BG N
91.5
Montrose
K216BF1 N
91.1
Aspen K218BF N
91.5
Silverton
K208EP1 N
89.5
Basalt KDUR Durango, CO
K207DT1  N
89.3
Carbondale K230AC N
93.9
N. La Plata Cty
K205AZ2
88.9
Glenwood Springs KUNC Greeley, CO
K215BD1 N
90.9
Redstone K202CV N
88.3
Breckenridge
K215AC
90.9
Snowmass K296CL4  N
107.1
Breckenridge
K206AQ1   N
89.1
Woody Creek K210AY
89.9
Buena Vista
KGNU Boulder, CO K215BE
90.9
Estes Park
K206DB N
89.1
Fort Collins K259AC
99.7
Gypsum
K229AC N
93.7
Ward K210BJ6 N
89.9
Holyoke
KDNK Carbondale, CO K206BD6 N
89.1
Julesburg
K202AT
88.3
Aspen K203BQ
88.5
Steamboat Springs
K202BA1 N
88.3
Basalt K214AK
90.7
Steamboat Springs
K202AB
88.3
Glenwood Springs K215AN
90.9
Sterling
K203EE N
88.5
Redstone K214AW
90.7
Walden
KRCC Colorado Springs, CO K228DL6 N
93.5
Wray
K239AE N
95.7
Buena Vista K204BH
88.7
Yuma
K289AH N
105.7
Canon City KSUT Ignacio, CO
K218DT N
91.5
Lake George K261CM3
100.1
Cortez/Mancos
K210CC N
89.9
Limon K220DZ3 N
91.9
Dolores
K211AW
90.1
Manitou Springs K208BG
89.5
Durango
K203AT
88.5
Westcliffe K287AA N
105.3
Pagosa Springs
KSJD Cortez, CO K210BA N
89.9
Purgatory
K216DA N
91.1
Dolores KVNF Paonia, CO
K216DB N
91.1
Dove Creek K252AM
98.3
Hotchkiss
K281AC3     N
104.1
Mancos K204BR N
88.7
Lake City
KBUT Crested Butte, CO K259AO
99.7
Montrose
K210BS N
89.9
Gunnison K210BP
89.9
Norwood
K235AK N
94.9
Jack's Cabin K211BH
90.1
Ouray
[KCFR-AMDenver, CO] K256AD N
99.1
Palisade
K211BS N
90.1
Craig K205BA
88.9
Ridgway
K203BB N
88.5
Gunnison KOTO Telluride, CO
K216BP N
91.1
Meeker K207AT N
89.3
Norwood
K218BE N
91.5
Ouray K207AU
89.3
Ophir
K202BI N
88.3
Parachute K207AS
89.3
Pandora
K216BO N
91.1
Rangley K288BM
105.5
Placerville
K202BJ
88.3
Rifle KANZ Garden City KS
K204BK N
88.7
Rio Blanco Cty K214CO
90.7
Lamar
KUVO Denver, CO WWFM Mercer County, NJ 
K209ED4 N
89.7
Breckenridge K269DS1  N
101.7
Aspen 
KVOD Denver, CO K224CE7  N
92.7
Canyon Valley 
K207CK4 N
89.3
Breckenridge K201AZ N
88.1
Carbondale
K273AE3  N
102.5
Cortez K265CS1 N
100.9
Carbondale 
K204DZ3 N
88.7
Dove Creek K219DA7  N
91.7
Steamboat Springs
K206BE N
89.1
Gunnison K292EG1  N
106.3
Thomasville

1 Licensed to Pitkin County Translator Dept., Pitkin County, CO. Operated by KAJX, Aspen, CO; KDNK, Carbondale, Co   or WWFM, Mercer County, NJ.
2Licensed to Valley Public Radio, Glenwood Springs, CO. Operated by KAJX, Aspen, CO.
3Licensed to Southwest Colorado TV Translator Assn., Cortez, CO. Operated by KSJD, Cortez, CO; KVOD, Denver, CO or KSUT, Ignacio, CO.
4 Licensed to Summit Public Radio and TV, Breckenridge, CO. Operated by KUVO, Denver, CO; KVOD, Denver, CO or KUNC, Greeley, CO.
5 Licensed to Lake County TV FM Inc., Leadville, CO. Operated by KVOD, Denver, CO.
6Licensed to Region # 1 Translator Assn., Yuma, CO. Operated by KUNC, Greeley, CO.
7 Licensed to West Slope FM, Steamboat Springs, CO. Operated by WWFM, Mercer County, NJ.

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