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KANSAS

     
  State population (2000 census)
2,688,418
     
  Population receiving a FM public radio signal
2,433,338
90.5%
   (from in and out-of-state stations)     
  Population in uncovered areas
255,080
  Population receiving AM & FM public radio signal  
     
  Stations in State FM stations
11
    FM translators
14
    AM stations
0
     
  1989 PTFP Study: Population receiving a
    FM public radio signal
1,950,000 
 
82%
         

Broadcast Coverage Maps

FM Stations - Detail         FM Stations - Printable


Public Radio Stations in State

Main stations in bold followed by associated repeaters and translators
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters
Location in ( ) - actual location of transmitting facilities
N - New facility since 1989 study     # - Station now meets study criteria

FM Stations
KANZ
91.1
Garden City    K242AP
96.3
St. Francis
   KZAN N
91.7
Hays    K208CL
89.5
Tribune
   KZNA
90.5
Hill City KHCC
90.1
Hutchinson
   K225AH
92.9
Ashland    KHCT N
90.9
Great Bend
   K237CN
95.3
Atwood    KHCD N
89.5
Salina
   K205BR
88.9
Colby KANU
91.5
Lawrence
   K212EN
90.3
Elkhart    KANH N
89.7
Emporia
   K225AG
92.9
Dodge City    KANV N
91.3
Olsburg
   K209CH  
89.7
Goodland    K210CR N
89.9
Atchison
   K222AK N
92.3
Hugoton KRPS
89.9
Pittsburg
   K242AK
96.3
Liberal    K217CI
91.3
Iola
   K225AF
92.9
Ness City KMUW
89.1
Wichita
   K214AU
90.7
Sharon Springs

AM Stations

None

General Comments

Four university and one community licensee serve Kansas with eleven stations and 14 translators.  Many portions of Kansas, especially in the western and southern parts of the state, are sparsely populated.  Portions of the state’s three largest cities, Wichita, Overland Park, and Kansas City, receive multiple program services.  In the case of Kansas City, the additional service is from Missouri stations.

FM Service

The 1989 PTFP study reported that there were seven FM stations and over 20 translators serving the state.  Five repeater stations and two translators have been constructed since 1989. Several translators were removed from operation when new, full service, facilities were installed.  KANU, Lawrence, constructed two stations, KANH Emporia and KANV Olsburg, to extend service to unserved areas of eastern Kansas.  The installation of KHCT Great Bend and KZAN Hays addressed several significant coverage gaps in west central Kansas.

Public broadcasters have increased the percentage of the population receiving a public radio signal from 82% in 1989 to 90.5% currently. The total number of unserved residents has declined from 414,000 in 1989 to 255,080

AM Service

None.  Kansas State University operated KKSU-AM, a share-time service, from its campus in Manhattan until 2002.  The university transferred its license to its share-time partner, a commercial operator.

Service from Adjacent States

Public broadcasters in Kansas City, Missouri, and the Nebraska Public Radio Network stations operating near to the Kansas-Nebraska border are the only out-of-state signals that reach into Kansas.  

Unserved Areas

Large areas of Kansas remain unserved by public radio.  Of the 95 counties in the state, 30 lack any significant public radio coverage. Two counties, Chautauqua in southeast Kansas and Kiowa in southwest Kansas, do not receive a public radio signal at all.

The population density throughout these areas is extremely low and remains the most significant factor in determining the feasibility of extending or establishing public radio coverage to these areas.  Despite this situation, most areas with significant population receive at least one public radio signal.

Region A

In the northwest corner of Kansas nearly 12,000 residents are without public radio service.  In many of these counties, the population density is under ten persons per square mile. Extending public radio coverage to this area would fill gaps in public radio coverage along I-70, a major east-west traffic artery across Kansas.

Region B

In the north central portion of Kansas, above KHCT, about 20,000 residents are without public radio service.

Region C

In eastern Kansas, nearly 100,000 residents do not receive a public radio signal within the area north of and between the coverage areas of KANV and KANU. This region includes the city of Manhattan, Kansas State University and Fort Riley Military Reservation.  Manhattan, Kansas, was served by a share-time AM station until 2002. 

Region D

Over 60,000 residents of southeast Kansas residing between KMUW Wichita and KRPS Pittsburg are without public radio service.

Region E

Over 43,000 residents in southwest Kansas are without public radio service. These residents live either between the coverage of KANZ Garden City and its translators or KANZ and KHCC and KMUW in central Kansas.

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