HomeApplication ProcessRules and PolciesAwarded Projects - you are hereFor GranteesTelevisionRadio Coverage DataDistance Learning and NonbroadcastAround the CountryContact PTFP Public Broadcasting Coverage
 
KENTUCKY

     
  State population (2000 census)
4,041,769
     
  Population receiving a FM public radio signal
3,695,432
  91.4%  
  (from both in and out-of-state stations)    
  Total population in uncovered areas
346,337
     
  Stations in State FM stations
16
    FM translators
8
    AM stations
0
     
  1989 PTFP Study: Population receiving a
    FM public radio signal
3,004,000  
82%  
         

Broadcast Coverage Maps

FM Stations - Detail         FM Stations - Printable

AM Stations - Detail         AM Stations - Printable

Public Radio Stations in State

Main stations in bold followed by associated repeaters and translators
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters
Location in ( ) - actual location of transmitting facilities
N - New facility since 1989 study     # - Station now meets study criteria

FM Stations
WKYU
88.9
Bowling Green WOCS N
88.3
Booneville
   WKUE N
90.9
Elizabethtown W202BH N
88.3
Inez
   WKPB N
89.5
Henderson WKMS
91.3
Murray
   WDCL
89.7
Somerset    W221BB N
92.1
Paducah
   W277AA N
103.3
Somerset WEKU
88.9
Richmond
WNKU
89.7
Highland Hts    WEKF N
88.5
Corbin
WUKY
91.3
Lexington    WEKH
90.9
Hazard
WFPK
91.9
Louisville  WMMT
88.7
Whitesburg
(New Albany, IN)    W218AI N
91.5
Barbourville
WFPL
89.3
Louisville     W217AB N
91.3
Harlan
(New Albany, IN)    W207AO N
89.3
Paintsville
WUOL
90.5
Louisville     W206AC N
89.1
Pikeville
(New Albany, IN)    W206AB N
89.1
Prestonburg
WMKY
90.3
Morehead

AM Stations  

None

General Comments

Public radio service in Kentucky is provided by stations licensed to universities and non‑profit community organizations.  The licensee of WKYU also operates a public television station.  Several Kentucky public broadcasters provide regional services.  Public radio listeners in Louisville are served by three stations, WFPK, WFPL, and WUOL, all owned and operated by Kentucky Public Radio, which was formed when two licensees agreed to merge into a single entity.    

FM Service  

The 1989 PTFP study reported that Kentucky residents were served by twelve stations. Three stations -- WKUE Elizabethtown, WKPB Henderson and WOCS Booneville -- have been activated to extend service into areas identified as uncovered in the 1989 study.  A fourth station, WEKF Corbin, was operating under program test authority as this study went to print and is included on the accompanying map.  It provides service to residents of Pulaski, McCreary, Whitley, and Laurel counties.  Kentucky public broadcasters also constructed nine translators to bring public radio to mountain communities.  Five of the new translators were built by WMMT Whitesburg. 

The percentage of Kentucky residents receiving public radio service increased from 82% in 1989 to 91.4%.  The number of people not receiving a public radio signal decreased from 657,000 in 1989 to 346,337 currently.

During the 1990's, WRVG Georgetown was an NPR member providing coverage just north of Lexington (site of WUKY).  This station did not meet the criteria for inclusion in the 1989 study.  The station was recently sold and is not included in this study.     

AM Service

While there are no public AM stations in Kentucky, a small portion of the state receives AM service from WPNL Nashville, Tennessee.

Service from Adjacent States

The transmitters for the three stations of Kentucky Public Radio in Louisville are actually located near New Albany, Indiana.  Kentucky residents who live along the Ohio River on the Ohio‑Kentucky border receive public radio service from stations WOUL, WOSP, WVXW, WVXU and WGUC.  WNIN Evansville, which is on the Ohio River on the Indiana‑Kentucky border, also provides public radio service to Kentucky residents.  WKNQ in Tennessee provides service to Fulton County and WPLN(AM) Nashville serves a small portion of southern Kentucky.

Unserved Areas

Kentucky public broadcasters have extended public radio coverage to most state residents but, because of rugged terrain, portions of the state identified as uncovered in 1989 remain either uncovered or with spotty coverage.  

Region A

In northern Kentucky, 17,630 residents of Gallatin, Grant, Bracken, Robertson, and Harrison counties have no public radio service.  

Region B

In the middle of Kentucky's western border with Indiana, 11,777 residents of Breckinridge and Meade counties have no public radio service.  

Region C 

In the eastern counties of Lawrence, Martin, Johnson, Floyd, and Pike on Kentucky's border with Virginia and West Virginia, 74,511 residents are without public radio service.  WEKU Richmond has applied for a permit to construct a translator to provide additional service to Pikeville (Pike County).

Region D  

In Union, Webster, and Hopkins counties in southwest Kentucky, 25,382 residents are without public radio service.

Region E  

In Ballard, Carlisle, Fulton and Hickman counties on the far western end of Kentucky, 14,470 residents are without public radio service.

Region F  

In the south-central Kentucky counties of Wayne, Clinton, Monroe, Cumberland, Allen and Barren, 32,287 residents lack public radio service.  

Region G  

In Bell, Clay, Harlan, Knox and Whitley counties in southeast Kentucky on the border with Virginia and Tennessee, 83,752 residents are without public radio service. WEKU Richmond has applied for permits to construct a translator to provide first service in Middlesboro (Bell County) and translators in Barbourville (Knox County) and Harlan (Harlan County) to provide additional service to those communities.

Bottom Line What's New Info for Grant Recipients How to Apply Calendar
Department of Commerce Web Site