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MISSOURI

     
  State population (2000 census)
5,595,211
     
  Population receiving a FM public radio signal
5,003,039
89.4%
  (from both in and out-of-state stations
  Population in uncovered areas
592,172
     
  Stations in State FM stations
17
    FM translators
7
    AM stations
0
     
  1989 PTFP Study: Population receiving a
    FM public radio signal
3,911,000
80%
         

Broadcast Coverage Maps

FM Stations - Detail         FM Stations - Printable

AM Stations - Detail         AM Stations - Printable


Public Radio Stations in State

Main stations in bold followed by associated repeaters and translators
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters
Location in ( ) - actual location of transmitting facilities
N - New facility since 1989 study     # - Station now meets study criteria

FM Stations
KRCU #
90.9
Cape Girardeau    KMNR #
89.7
Rolla
KBIA
89.5
Columbia    K242AN N
96.3
Lebanon
   KKTR1 N
89.7
Kirksville KDHX
93.1
St. Louis
   K210AU1
89.9
Kirksville KWMU 
90.7
St. Louis
   K210AG N
89.9
Osage Beach KSMU
91.1
Springfield
KOPN
91.3
Columbia    KSMS #
90.5
Branson
KJLU #
88.9
Jefferson City    KSMW N
90.9
West Plains
KCUR
89.3
Kansas City    K255AH
98.9
Joplin
KKFI
90.1
Kansas City     K201CI N
88.1
Mt. Grove
KXCV
90.5
Maryville    K279AD N
103.7
Neosho
   KRNW N
88.9
Chillicothe KTBG
90.9
Warrensburg
KUMR
88.5
Rolla    K285ER N
104.9
Osage Beach

AM Stations

None

1 Licensed to Truman State University, Kirksville, MO. Operated by KBIA, Columbia, MO.


General Comments

Seventeen public radio stations and seven translators now provide public radio service in Missouri. This service is primarily provided by university licensed radio stations with community non-profit organizations operating stations in Kansas City, Columbia, and St. Louis.  Multiple program services are available to residents of four of the state's five largest cities, Kansas City, St. Louis, Independence, and Columbia.  

FM Service

This survey includes six stations that did not appear on the station roster of the 1989 PTFP study.  Three stations -- KRNW Chillicothe, KKTR Kirksville and KSMW West Plains -- were erected since 1989. Four stations -- KRCU Cape Girardeau, KJLU Jefferson City, KMNR Rolla and KSMS Branson -- were in operation in 1989 but did not meet criteria for inclusion in the previous study. They are included in this study and indicated by the # symbol on the station list.  Four translators have been built since 1989.  One station included in the 1989 study, KBFL Buffalo, was sold by the school board that held its license and it is now operated as a commercial station. 

The percentage of Missouri residents who can receive public radio has increased from 80% in 1989 to 89.3% currently.  The number of people who cannot receive a public radio signal has decreased from 1,006,000 in 1989 to 592,172.

AM Service

Signals from two Iowa public AM stations serve parts of Missouri.  In northern Missouri, the signal of WOI(AM) Ames, Iowa, covers the northern tier of unserved Missouri counties during daylight hours.  The AM signal of WSUI Iowa City reaches the far northeast corner of Missouri during daylight hours.  

Service from Adjacent States

In addition to the AM radio service noted in the previous section, Missouri residents also receive public radio service from other neighboring states.  From Illinois WIUW McComb, with its transmitter in Warsaw on the Mississippi River, WQUB Quincy, WSIE Edwardsville, and WSIU Carbondale, cover counties on the Illinois-Missouri border. The Missouri Boot Heel in the far southeastern corner of the state is covered by signals from WKNQ Dyersburg, Tennessee, and KASU Jonesboro, Arkansas.  Counties in the southwest corner of Missouri on the Missouri-Kansas border are covered by a signal from KRPS Pittsburg, Kansas.  

Unserved Areas

Region A

The city of St. Joseph and Buchanan County, north of Kansas City on the Iowa-Kansas border, have over 55,000 unserved residents. This area falls between the contours of the Kansas City public radio stations and KXCV Maryville.

Region B

A nine county area along the Missouri-Iowa border has over 50,000 unserved residents, 82% of the area’s population. The area does receive daytime service from AM stations WOI and WSUI in Iowa.    

Region C 

This area, between Columbia and St. Louis, contains over 60,000 residents without public radio service.  Terrain issues exist due to hills and valleys being the predominant geographic features of the area.    

Region D  

Approximately 109,000 residents in this nine county area of western Missouri are without public radio service. The terrain in this region contains big hills and deep valleys and includes the Truman Reservoir and the Lake of the Ozarks.    

Region E  

The far southwest corner of Missouri includes three counties with nearly 20,000 residents without public radio service.  This area, the intersection of Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri, is an extension of the Ozarks and the terrain includes many steep river valleys.

Region F  

Over 40,000 residents in this area are without public radio service.  This is the Ozarks area of Missouri, east of Branson, above and along the Arkansas border.  

Region G  

Almost 200,000 residents, or about 64% of the population, in a 16 county region of southeast Missouri are without public radio service. National forest cuts through the middle of this area. Carter County, the only county in Missouri without any public radio service, is located here.  KRCU Cape Girardeau is currently constructing a new station in Farmington. This new station will bring first service to about 70,000 residents in this area.  An FM application is currently pending FCC action for Butler County in Southeast Missouri, but is currently mutually exclusive with other applicants.  If granted, this station will extend public radio FM coverage to more than 50,000 uncovered residents in the region.

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