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NORTH DAKOTA

  

     
  State population (2000 census)
642,200
     
  Population receiving a FM public radio signal
557,176
86.8%
  (from both in and out-of-state stations)
  Population in uncovered FM areas
85,024
     
  Stations in State FM stations
11
    FM translators
9
    AM stations
1
     
  1989 PTFP Study: Population receiving a
    FM public radio signal
452,000
69%
       

Broadcast Coverage Maps

FM Stations - Detail         FM Stations - Printable

AM Stations - Detail         AM Stations - Printable


Public Radio Stations in State

Main stations in bold followed by associated repeaters and translators
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters
Location in ( ) - actual location of transmitting facilities
N - New facility since 1989 study     # - Station now meets study criteria

FM Stations
KEYA
88.5
Belcourt    K220FJ N
91.9
Bowman
KCND
90.5
Bismarck    K208BF2
89.5
Crary
   KDPR
89.9
Dickinson    K220FF N
91.9
Crosby
   KDSU1
91.9
Fargo    K218AV2
91.5
Devils Lake
   KFJM2 N
90.7
Grand Forks    K220FD N
91.9
Harvey
   KUND2
89.3
Grand Forks    K220FG N
91.9
Hettinger
   KPRJ N
91.5
Jamestown    K219AX2
91.7
Lakota
   KMPR
88.9
Minot    K220FH N
91.9
Tioga
   KPPR
89.5
Williston KMHA
91.3
Fort Berthold
   K220FI N
91.9
Beach KABU N
90.7
Fort Totten
AM Stations
KUND
1370
Grand Forks

1 Licensed to North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND. Operated by KCND, Bismarck, ND.
2 Licensed to the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND. Operated by KCND, Bismarck, ND.

General Comments

Public radio in North Dakota is primarily provided by a statewide network of eight stations and nine translators operated by Prairie Public Broadcasting, a community group that also provides public television throughout the state.  Three additional public radio stations are licensed to Native American tribal governments.  Few communities in the state receive multiple services.  There is one public AM station in the state.    

FM Service

Eight stations and three translators were included in the 1989 PTFP study. Three stations and six translators have been constructed to extend public radio coverage to the principal population centers of the state.

Two new stations, KPRJ Jamestown and KABU Fort Totten, cover areas of the state that were identified without service in the 1989 study.  KFJM is a new station providing a second service to Grand Forks.  New translators in Beach, Bowman, Crosby, Hettinger and Tioga provide service to smaller communities in the far western counties of the state.  The same is true for the new translator at Harvey between KMPR and KABU.

The percentage of North Dakota residents receiving public radio service increased from 69% in 1989 to 86.8% currently.  The number of people not receiving a public radio signal was reduced from 201,000 in 1989 to 85,024.     

AM Service  

North Dakota Public Radio operates KUND(AM) 1370 kHz in Grand Forks.  The station operates with 1 kW during the daytime and 250 watts at night. KUND(AM)’s licensee, the University of North Dakota, announced in January 2004 that it is accepting bids for the purchase of the AM station. The property where the transmitter is located is to be developed for commercial and residential purposes. The cost of relocating the transmitter is prohibitive.     

Service from Adjacent States

Several counties in the border areas of the state receive public radio service from stations broadcasting from Minnesota and South Dakota.

Unserved Areas

The principal population centers of North Dakota receive public radio service as do the three Indian reservations within the state. Beyond these areas the population is sparse. Across the state the population density is nine persons per square mile. In some counties, however, it is as low as 1.5 persons per square mile. 

Region A

This region encompasses four counties in the northwest corner of the state and includes about 6,000 residents without public radio service.

Region B  

The northeast corner of North Dakota has over 15,000 residents without public radio FM Service.  KUND(AM) in Grant Forks covers the area between KABU and KUND-FM with its daytime signal.

Region C

The southwest corner of the state has about 2,500 residents without public radio service.

Region D  

Within this area, between KDPR and KCND, the total unserved population is approximately 16,000 residents.  Almost half of these unserved people, about 7,000, live in Mercer County.

Region E  

The east central section of the state encompassing ten counties is the single largest area of the state without public radio service.  In this area over 20,000 residents are not receiving public radio services.

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