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UTAH

     
  State population (2000 census)
2,233,169
     
  Population receiving a FM public radio signal
2,125,865
95.2%
  (from both in and out-of-state stations)
  Population in uncovered areas
107,304
     
  Stations in State FM stations
9
    FM Boosters
1
    FM translators
59
    AM stations
0
     
  1989 PTFP Study: Population receiving a
    FM public radio signal
1,266,000
 
87%
         

Broadcast Coverage Maps

FM Stations - Detail         FM Stations - Printable


Public Radio Stations in State

Main stations in bold followed by associated repeaters and translators
Translators are shown at the end of the narrative
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters
Location in ( ) - actual location of transmitting facilities
N - New facility since 1989 study     # - Station now meets study criteria

FM Stations
KUSU
91.5
Logan KBYU N
89.1
Provo
   KUSR N
89.5
Logan KRCL
90.9
Salt Lake City
KZMU N
89.7
Moab KUER
90.1
Salt Lake City
KPCW
91.9
Park City    KUER1 N
90.1
Alta
   KCUA1
92.5
Coalville      
   KCPW N
88.3
Salt Lake City        

AM Stations     

None

1 Licensed to 3 Point Media-Coalville LLC. Operated by KPCW, Park City, UT.


General Comments

Public radio in Utah is provided by three university licensees and three community licensees. The licensees of KBYU and KUER also operate public television stations.  Over 80% of the state's population lives in the area east of the Great Salt Lake, in an area extending from Logan south to Provo.  This area is served by multiple program services..  KUER and KUSU operate extensive statewide translator networks which are listed at the end of this section while the other four licensees serve particular locales within the state. The statewide translator networks provide many communities in the state with multiple program services.  

FM Service

The 1989 PTFP study reported the presence of five public radio stations in the state as well as 23 translators.  Since the 1989 study, major increases in coverage have occurred among all six licensees.  The number of FM stations has increased to nine while the number of translators has increased to 59.  (KUER also has a booster station, shown on the list as KUER1).  A local station was established in Moab in southeastern Utah and translators have been built along the I‑15 corridor from Cedar City north to Provo in the central western part of the state. Coverage has also been extended in northeastern Utah along US 40 between Provo and Vernal including the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservations.

KUER Salt Lake City is rebuilding and extending its network of translators by piggybacking on the Utah Education Network's fiber and microwave backbone system.

Many communities now receive multiple public radio signals, including smaller towns such as Milford, Price and Randolph, as well the larger cities of Provo and Salt Lake City and fast‑growing St. George in the southwest corner of the state.

There have been significant geographical coverage gains since 1989, and the percentage of Utah's population receiving a signal has increased from 87% in 1989 to 95.2% currently.  The total number of residents not receiving a public radio signal has been reduced from 195,000 in 1989 to 107,304. The dichotomy between the geographical extensions of the service resulting in a relatively small increase in population covered is explained by the scattered nature of rural population in the state. 

AM Service

None   

Service from Adjacent States

While portions of Utah are covered by signals from stations in each of the adjacent states Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona and Nevadathe areas covered contain few communities. 

Unserved Areas

Utah is a land of wide-open spaces. Sixty-five percent of the land in Utah is under federal management.  Though significant portions of the state do not receive a public radio signal, these areas are very sparsely populated and typically under the administration of federal agencies including the Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, National Park Service and the Department of Defense. Many of these areas are remote and may not be able to support even a translator signal. Regardless, Utah public broadcasters have done well in identifying areas requiring service and providing it accordingly.

Region A

The six counties extending along the Nevada border­__Box Elder, Tooele, Juab, Millard, Beaver, and Iron -- are sparsely populated.  These counties comprise a land area larger than Maryland.  Although there are translators in the population centers of Cedar City, Milford, and Beaver, approximately 10,000 people in this region cannot receive public radio.  Utilizing the Utah Education Network's fiber and microwave backbone system, KUER has proposals to extend its service to the community of Stockton in Tooele County.  

Region B  

Two repeaters from two services are located near Price, the population center of Carbon County in the east central part of the state.  Seventeen thousand residents remain unserved in the county, however.  In adjacent Emery County, there are 10,000 individuals without public radio service although there is a translator in Green River, the major town in the county, and an additional translator west of Green River.      

Region C 

Washington County, in the southwest corner of Utah, has four translators to serve the communities of St. George and Washington. Twenty-two thousand  residents remain unserved. Like much of Utah, a sizable portion of the county is rugged remote territory including federal wilderness areas and Zion National Park. The county's population is concentrated along the I‑15 highway corridor.    

Region D  

Southeast Utah consists of national parks, forests, monuments, and recreation areas.  The largest unserved population lives in San Juan County, in the southeast corner of the state.  The county is larger than Connecticut and has a total population of 14,000 people.  Despite the presence of a translator in Monticello, half the county's residents, 7,000 people, cannot receive public radio.  Utilizing the Utah Education Network's fiber and microwave backbone system, KUER has proposals to extend its service to the community of Bluff in San Juan County.

Translators listed by operating station
Facilities in italics operated by out‑of‑state broadcasters

KUSU Logan, UT KUER Salt Lake City, UT
K208CS N
89.5
Brigham City K211DH N
90.1
Annabella
K247AG N
97.3
Cedar City K211CL N
90.1
Beaver
K208AJ
89.5
Delta K202AW
88.3
Cedar City
K215BY N
90.9
Emery County K201BY N
88.1
Delta
K244DH N
96.7
Fort Douglas K211CP N
90.1
Emery County
K220FC N
91.9
Hanksville K211CK N
90.1
Fillmore
K207AH N
89.3
Laketown K216BR N
91.1
Heber City
K214AJ N
90.7
Milford K209BG N
89.7
Huntsville
K218AJ
91.5
Monroe K211BB
90.1
Kanab
K223AK N
92.5
Ogden K213AA
90.5
Laketown
K204CO N
88.7
Panguitch K211CQ N
90.1
Manila/Dutch John
K208CA N
89.5
Parowan K202BG N
88.3
Manti
K218CB N
91.5
Price K203CA N
88.5
Milford
K204BO N
88.7
Provo K280BT N
107.1
Milford
K216AD
91.1
Randolph K218AA
91.5
Moab
K212AZ N
90.3
Rockville K269BP N
101.7
Monroe
K261CL N
100.1
Roosevelt K211CS N
90.1
Monticello
K215CF N
90.9
St. George K213BC N
90.5
North Moab
K292DA
106.3
Tabiona K202AD N
88.3
Orangeville
K233AF N
94.5
Teasdale K208AG
89.5
Park City
K209AJ
89.7
Vernal K211BU N
90.1
Parowan
K218CT N
91.5
Vernal K208AQ
89.5
Price
K205ES N
88.9
Washington K202AF
88.3
Randolph
KZMU Moab, UT K213AM
90.5
St. George
K291AF N
106.1
Castle Valley K203AB
88.5
Summit County
KPCW Park City, UT K285BK
104.9
Tabiona
K201AE
88.1
Coalville K201CF N
88.1
Ticaboo
K218DQ N
91.5
Heber City K211BJ N
90.1
Toquerville
KBYU Provo, UT K216AC
91.1
Tropic
K208BZ N
89.5
Spanish Fork K211CV N
90.1
Vernal
KRCL Salt Lake City, UT K300AC N
107.9
Washington
K243AC N
96.5
Park City
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