US Footnotes

US Footnotes

(These footnotes, each consisting of the letters US followed by one or more digits, denote stipu- lations applicable to both Government and non-Government stations.)

US7--In the band 420-450 MHz and within the following areas, the peak envelope power output of a transmitter employed in the amateur service shall not exceed 50 watts, unless expressly authorized by the Commission after mutual agreement, on a case-by-case basis, between the Federal Communications Commission Engineer in Charge at the applicable district office and the military area frequency coordinator at the applicable military base. For areas (e) through (j), the appropriate military coordinator is located at Peterson AFB, CO.

(a) Those portions of Texas and New Mexico bounded on the south by latitude 31 45' North, on the east by 104 00' West, on the north by latitude 34o30' North, and on the west by longitude 107 30' West;

(b) The entire State of Florida including the Key West area and the areas enclosed within a 322 kilometer (200-mile) radius of Patrick Air Force Base, Florida (latitude 28 21' North, longitude 80 43' West), and within a 322 kilometer (200-mile) radius of Eglin Air Force Base, Florida (latitude 30 30' North, longitude 86 30' West);

(c) The entire State of Arizona;

(d) Those portions of California and Nevada south of latitude 37 10' North, and the areas enclosed within a 322 kilometer (200-mile) radius of the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California (latitude 34 09' North, longitude 119 11' West).

(e) In the State of Massachusetts within a 160-kilometer (100 mile) radius around locations at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts (latitude 41 45' North, longitude 70 32' West).

(f) In the State of California within a 240-kilometer (150 mile) radius around locations at Beale Air Force Base, California (latitude 39 08' North, longitude 121 26' West).

(g) In the State of Alaska within a 160 kilometer (100 mile) radius of Clear, Alaska (latitude 64 degrees, 17' North, longitude 149 degrees 10' West).

(h) In the State of North Dakota within a 160 kilometer (100 mile) radius of Concrete, North Dakota (latitude 48 degrees 43' North, longitude 97 degrees 54' West).

(i) In the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina within a 200 kilome- ter (124 mile) radius of Warner Robins Air Force Base, Georgia (latitude 32 38' North, longitude 83 35' West).

(j) In the State of Texas within a 200-kilometer (124 mile) radius of Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas (latitude 31 25' North, longi- tude 100 24' West).

US8--The use of frequencies 170.475, 171.425, 171.575 and 172.275 MHz east of the Mississippi River, and 170.425, 170.575, 171.475, 172.225 and 172.375 MHz west of the Mississippi River may be authorized to fixed, land and mobile stations operated by non-Federal forest firefighting agencies. In addition, land stations and mobile stations operated by non-Federal conservation agencies, for mobile relay operation only, may be authorized to use the frequency 172.275 MHz east of the Mississippi River and the frequency 171.475 MHz west of the Missis- sippi River. The use of any of the foregoing nine frequencies shall be on the condition that no harmful interference will be caused to Govern- ment stations.

US10--The use of the frequencies 26.62, 143.75, 143.90 and 148.15 MHz may be authorized to Civil Air Patrol land stations and Civil Air Patrol mobile stations.

US11--The use of the frequencies 166.250 and 170.150 MHz may be authorized to non-Government remote pickup broadcast base and land mobile stations and to non-Government base, fixed and land mobile stations in the public safety radio services (the sum of the bandwidth of emission and tolerance is not to exceed 25 kHz, except that authorizations in existence as of De- cember 20, 1974, using a larger bandwidth are permitted to continue in operation until December 20, 1979) in the continental United States (ex- cluding Alaska) only, except within the area bounded on the west by the Mississippi River, on the north by the parallel of latitude 37o30' N., and on the east and south by that arc of the circle with center at Springfield, Illinois, and radius equal to the airline distance between Springfield, Illinois, and Montgomery, Alabama, subtended between the foregoing west and north boundaries, on the conditions that harmful interference will not be caused to Government stations present or future in the Government and 162-174 MHz. The use of these frequencies by remote pickup broadcast stations will not be authorized for locations within 240 kilometers (150 miles) of New York City; and use of these frequencies by the public safety radio services will not be authorized except for locations within 240 kilometers (150 miles) of New York City.

US13--For the specific purpose of transmitting hydrological and meteorological data in cooperation with agencies of the Federal Government, the following frequencies may be authorized to non-Government fixed stations on the condition that harmful interference will not be caused to Government stations:

        MHz        MHz        MHz        MHz
     169.425    170.275    171.125    406.175
     169.450    170.300    171.825    409.675
     169.475    170.325    171.850    409.725
     169.500    171.025    171.875    412.625
     169.525    171.050    171.900    412.675
     170.225    171.075    171.925    412.725
     170.250    171.100    406.125    412.775

Licensees holding a valid authorization on June 11, 1962, to operate on the frequencies 169.575, 170.375, or 171.975 MHz may continue to be authorized for such operations on the condition that harmful interference will not be caused to Government stations.

US14--When 500 kHz is being used for distress purposes, ship and coast stations using morse telegraphy may use 512 kHz for calling.

US18--Navigation aids in the US and possessions in the bands 9-14 kHz, 90-110 kHz, 190-415 kHz, 510-535 kHz, and 2700-2900 MHz are normally operated by the U.S. Govern- ment. However, authorizations may be made by the FCC for non-Government operation in these bands subject to the conclusion of appropriate arrangements between the FCC and the Govern- ment agencies concerned and upon special show- ing of need for service which the Government is not yet prepared to render.

US25--The use of frequencies in the band 25.85-26.1. MHz may be authorized in any area to non-Government remote pickup broadcast base and mobile stations on the condition that harmful interference is not caused to stations in the broadcasting service.

US26--The bands 117.975-121.4125 MHz, 123.5875-128.8125 MHz and 132.0125-136 MHz are for air traffic control communica- tions.

US28--The band 121.5875-121.9375 MHz is for use by aeronautical utility land and mobile stations, and for air traffic control commu- nications.

US30--The band 121.9375-123.0875 MHz is available to FAA aircraft for communica- tions pursuant to flight inspection functions in accordance with the Federal Aviation Act of 1958.

US31--Except as provided below the band 121.9375-123.0875 MHz is for use by private aircraft stations.

The frequencies 122.700, 122.725, 122.750, 122.800, 122.950, 122.975, 123.000, 123.050 and 123.075 MHz may be assigned to aeronautical advisory stations. In addi- tion, at landing areas having a part-time or no airdrome control tower or FAA flight service station, these frequencies may be assigned on a secondary non-interference basis to aeronautical utility mobile stations, and may be used by FAA ground vehicles for safety related communications during inspections conducted at such landing areas.

The frequencies 122.850, 122.900 and 122.- 925 MHz may be assigned to aeronautical multi- com stations. In addition, 122.850 MHz may be assigned on a secondary non-interference basis to aeronautical utility mobile stations. In case of 122.925 MHz, US213 applies.

Air carrier aircraft stations may use 122.000 and 122.050 MHz for communication with aeronautical stations of the Federal Aviation Administration and 122.700, 122.800, 122.900 and 123.000 MHz for communications with aeronautical stations pertaining to safety of flight with and in the vicinity of landing areas not served by a control tower.

Frequencies in the band 121.9375-122.6875 MHz may be used by aeronautical stations of the Federal Aviation Administration for communica- tion with private aircraft stations only, except that 122.000 and 122.050 MHz may also be used for communication with air carrier aircraft stations concerning weather information.

US32--Except for the frequencies 123.3 and 123.5 MHz which are not authorized for Government use, the band 123.1125-123.5875 MHz is available for FAA Communications incident to flight test and inspection activities pertinent to aircraft and facility certification on a secondary non-interference basis.

US33--The band 123.1125-123.5875 MHz is for use by flight test and aviation instructional stations. The frequency 121.950 MHz is available for aviation instructional stations.

US41--The Government radiolocation service is permitted in the band 2450-2500 MHz on the condition that harmful interference is not caused to non-Government services.

US44--The non-Government radiolocation service may be authorized in the band 2900-3100 MHz on the condition that no harmful interference is caused to Government ser- vices.

US48--The non-Government radiolocation service may be authorized in the bands 5350-5460 MHz and 9000-9200 MHz on the condition that it does not cause harmful interference to the aeronautical radionavigation service or to the Government radiolocation service.

US49--The non-Government radiolocation service may be authorized in the band 5460-5470 MHz on the condition that it does not cause harmful interference to the aeronautical or maritime radionavigation services or to the Government radiolocation service.

US50--The non-Government radiolocation service may be authorized in the band 5470-5600 MHz on the condition that it does not cause harmful interference to the maritime radionavigation service or to the Government radiolocation service.

US51--In the bands 5600-5650 MHz and 9300-9500 MHz, the non-Government radiolocation service shall not cause harmful inter- ference to the Government radiolocation service.

US53--In view of the fact that the band 13.25-13.4 GHz is allocated to doppler navigation aids, Government and non-Government airborne doppler radars in the aeronautical radionavigation service are permitted in the band 8750-8850 MHz only on the condition that they must accept any interference which may be experi- enced from stations in the radiolocation service in the band 8500-10000 MHz.

US54--Temporarily, and until certain operations of the radiolocation service in the band 9000-9200 MHz can be transferred to other appropriate frequency bands, the aeronauti- cal radionavigation service may, in certain geo- graphical areas, be subject to receiving some degree of interference from the radiolocation service.

US58--In the band 10000-10500 MHz, pulsed emissions are prohibited, except for weather radars on board meteorological-satellites in the band 10000-10025 MHz. The amateur service and the non-Government radiolocation service, which shall not cause harmful interference to the Government radiolocation service, are the only non-Government services permitted in this band. The non-Government radiolocation service is limited to survey operations as specified in footnote US108.

US59--The band 10.5-10.55 GHz is restricted to systems using type N0N emission with a power not to exceed 40 watts into the antenna.

US65--The use of the band 5460-5650 MHz by the maritime radionavigation service is limited to shipborne radars.

US66--The use of the band 9300-9500 MHz by the aeronautical radionavigation service is limited to airborne radars and associated airborne beacons. In addition, ground-based radar beacons in the aeronautical radionavigation service are permitted in the band 9300-9320 MHz on condition that harmful interference is not caused to the maritime radionavigation service.

US67--The use of the band 9300-9500 MHz by the meteorological aids service is limited to ground based radars. Radiolocation installations will be coordinated with the meteoro- logical aids service and, insofar as practicable, will be adjusted to meet the requirements of the meteorological aids service.

US69--In the band 31.8-33.4 GHz, ground-based radionavigation aids are not permitted except where they operate in co-operation with airborne or shipborne radionavigation devices.

US70--The meteorological aids service allocation in the band 400.15-406 MHz does not preclude the operation therein of associated ground transmitters.

US71--In the band 9300-9320 MHz, low-powered maritime radionavigation stations shall be protected from harmful interference caused by the operation of land-based equipment.

US74--In the bands 25.55-25.67, 73-74.6, 406.1-410, 608-614, 1400-1427, 1660.5-1670, 2690-2700, and 4990-5000 MHz and in the bands 10.68-10.7, 15.35-15.4, 23.6-24, 31.3-31.8, 86-92, 105-116, and 217-231 GHz, the radio astronomy service shall be protected from extraband radiation only to the extent such radiation exceeds the level which would be present if the offending station were operating in compli- ance with the technical standards or criteria applicable to the service in which it operates.

US77--Government stations may also be authorized:

(a) Port operations use on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations on the frequencies 156.6 and 156.7 MHz;

(b) Duplex port operations use of the frequency 157.0 MHz for ship stations and 161.6 MHz for coast stations;

(c) Intership use of 156.3 MHz on a simplex basis; and

(d) Vessel traffic services under the control of the U.S. Coast Guard on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations on the frequencies 156.25, 156.55, 156.6 and 156.7 MHz.

(e) Navigational bridge-to-bridge and navigational communications on a simplex basis by coast and ship stations on the frequencies 156.375 and 156.65 MHz.

US78--The frequencies between 1435 and 1535 MHz will be assigned for aeronautical telemetry and associated telecommand operations for flight testing of manned or un- manned aircraft and missiles, or their major components. Permissible usage includes telemetry associated with launching and reentry into the earth's atmosphere as well as any incidental orbiting prior to reentry of manned or unmanned objects undergoing flight tests. The following frequencies are shared with flight telemetering mobile stations: 1444.5, 1453.5, 1501.5, 1515.5, 1524.5 and 1525.5 MHz. In the band 1530-1535 MHz, the Maritime Mobile-Satellite Service will be the only primary service after January 1, 1990.

US80--Government stations may use the frequency 122.9 MHz subject to the following conditions:

(a) All operations by Government stations shall be restricted to the purpose for which the frequency is authorized to non-Government stations, and shall be in accordance with the appropriate provisions of the Commission's rules and regulations, Part 87, Aviation Services;

(b) Use of the frequency is required for coordination of activities with Commission licens- ees operating on this frequency; and

(c) Government stations will not be autho- rized for operations at fixed locations.

US81--The band 38-38.25 MHz is used by both Government and non-Government radio astronomy observatories. No new fixed or mobile assignments are to be made and Govern- ment stations in the band 38-38.25 MHz will be moved to other bands on a case-by-case basis, as required, to protect radio astronomy observations from harmful interference. As an exception however, low powered military transportable and mobile stations used for tactical and training pur- poses will continue to use the band. To the extent practicable, the latter operations will be adjusted to relieve such interference as may be caused to radio astronomy observations. In the event of harmful interference from such local operations, radio astronomy observatories may contact local military commands directly, with a view to effecting relief. A list of military commands, areas of coordination, and points of contact for purposes of relieving interference may be obtained upon request from the Office of the Chief Scientist, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, D.C. 20554.

US82--Until July 1, 1991, the assignable frequencies in the bands 4143.6-4146.6 kHz, 6218.6-6224.6 kHz, 8291.1-8297.3 kHz, 12429.2-12439.5 kHz, 16587.1-16596.4 kHz and 22124-22139.5 kHz may be authorized on a shared non-priority basis to Government and non-Government ship and coast stations (SSB tele- phony, with peak envelope power not to exceed 1 kW). Effective July 1, 1991, the assignable frequencies in the bands 4146-4152 kHz, 6224-6233 kHz, 8294-8300 kHz, 12353-12368 kHz, 16528-16549 kHz, 18825-18846 kHz, 22159-22180 kHz, and 25100-25121 kHz may be autho- rized on a shared non-priority basis to Govern- ment and non-Government ship and coast stations (SSB telephony, with peak envelope power not to exceed 1 kW).

US87--The frequency 450 MHz, with maximum emission bandwidth of 500 kHz, may be used by Government and non-Government stations for space telecommand at specific locations, subject to such conditions as may be applied on a case-by-case basis.

US90--In the band 2025-2110 MHz Earth-to-space and space-to-space transmissions may be authorized in the space research and earth exploration-satellite services subject to such conditions as may be applied on a case-by-case basis. Such transmissions shall not cause harmful interference to non-Government stations operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Alloca- tions. All space-to-space transmission reaching the earth's surface shall adhere to a power flux density of between 144 and 154 dBw/m2/4 kHz depending on the angle of arrival per ITU Radio Regulation 2557 and shall not cause harmful interference to the other space services.

US93--In the conterminous United States, the frequency 108.0 MHz may be authorized for use by VOR test facilities, the operation of which is not essential for the safety of life or property, subject to the condition that no interference is caused to the reception of FM broadcasting stations operating in the band 88-108 MHz. In the event that such interference does occur, the licensee or other agency authorized to operate the facility shall discontinue operation on 108 MHz and shall not resume operation until the interference has been eliminated or the complaint otherwise satisfied. VOR test facilities operating on 108 MHz will not be protected against interfer- ence caused by FM broadcasting stations operating in the band 88-108 MHz nor shall the authori- zation of a VOR test facility on 108 MHz preclude the Commission from authorizing additional FM broadcasting stations.

US99--In the band 1668.4-1670 MHz, the meteorological aids service (radiosonde) will avoid operations to the maximum extent practicable. Whenever it is necessary to operate radiosondes in the band 1668.4-1670 MHz within the United States, notification of the operations shall be sent as far in advance as possible to the Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Unit, Na- tional Science Foundation, Washington, D.C. 20550.

US102--In Alaska only, the frequency 122.1 MHz may also be used for air carrier air traffic control purposes at locations where other frequencies are not available to air carrier aircraft stations for air traffic control.

US104--The LORAN Radionavigation System has priority in the band 90-110 kHz in the United States and Possessions. Radiolocation land stations making use of LORAN type equipment may be authorized to both Gov- ernment and non-Government on a Secondary Service basis for offshore radiolocation activities only at specific locations and subject to such technical and operational conditions (e.g., power, emission, pulse rate and phase code, hours of operation), including on-the-air testing, as may be required on a case-by-case basis to ensure protection of the LORAN Radionavigation System from harmful interference and to ensure mutual compatibility among radiolocation operators. Such authorizations to stations in the radiolocation service are further subject to showing of need for service which is not currently provided and which the Government is not yet prepared to render by way of the radionavigation service.

US106--The frequency 156.75 MHz is available for assignment to non-Government and Government stations for environmental communications in accordance with an agreed plan.

US107--The frequency 156.8 MHz is the international distress, safety and calling fre- quency for the maritime mobile VHF radiotele- phone service for use by Government and non-Go- vernment ship and coast stations. Guard bands of 156.7625-156.7875 and 156.8125-156.8375 MHz are maintained.

US108--Within the bands 3300-3500 MHz and 10000-10500 MHz, survey operations, using transmitters with a peak power not to exceed five watts into the antenna, may be authorized for Government and non-Government use on a secondary basis to other Government radiolocation operations.

US110--In the frequency bands 3100-3300 MHz, 3500-3700 MHz, 5250-5350 MHz, 8500-9000 MHz, 9200-9300 MHz, 9500-10000 MHz, 13.4-14.0 GHz, 15.7-17.3 GHz, 24.05-24.25 GHz and 33.4-36 GHz, the non-Government radiolocation service shall be secondary to the Government radiolocation service and to airborne doppler radars at 8800 MHz, and shall provide protection to airport surface detection equipment (ASDE) operating between 15.7-16.2 GHz.

US111--In the band 1990-2120 MHz, Government space research earth stations may be authorized to use specific frequencies at specific locations for earth-to-space transmissions. Such authorizations shall be secondary to non-Go- vernment use of this band and subject to such other conditions as may be applied on a case-by-case basis.

Corpus Christi, Tex., 27 39'N 097 23'W.

Fairbanks, Alaska, 64 59' N 147 53' W.

Goldstone, Calif., 35 18' N 116 54' W.

Greenbelt, Md., 39 00' N 076 50' W.

Guam, Mariana Is., 13 19' N 144 44' E.

Kauai, Hawaii, 22 08' N 159 40' W.

Merritt Is., Fla., 28 29' N 080 35' W.

Roseman, N.C., 35 12' N 082 52' W.

Wallops Is., Va., 37 57' N 075 28' W.

US112--The frequency 123.1 MHz is for search and rescue communications. This frequency may be assigned for air traffic control communications at special aeronautical events on the condition that no harmful interference is caused to search and rescue communications during any period of search and rescue operations in the locale involved.

US116--In the bands 890-902 MHz, 928-932 MHz, and 935-941 MHz, no new assign- ments are to be made to Government radio stations after July 10, 1970, except, on a case-by-case basis, to experimental stations and to addi- tional stations of existing networks in Alaska. Government assignments existing prior to July 10, 1970 to stations in Alaska may be continued. All other existing Government assignments shall be on a secondary basis to stations in the non-Gover- nment land mobile service and shall be subject to adjustment or removal from the bands 890-902 MHz, 928-932 MHz, and 935-941 MHz, at the request of the FCC.

US117--In the band 406.1-410 MHz, all new authorizations will be limited to a maximum 7 watts per kHz of necessary band- width; existing authorizations as of November 30, 1970 exceeding this power are permitted to continue in use.

New authorizations in this band for stations, other than mobile and transportable stations, within the following areas are subject to prior coordination by the applicant through the Electro- magnetic Spectrum Management Unit, National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C. 20550 (202-357-9696): Arecibo Observatory:

Rectangle between latitudes 17o 30' N and 19o 00' N and between longitudes 65o 10' W and 68o 00' W.

Owens Valley Radio Observatory:

Two contiguous rectangles, one between lati- tudes 36o N and 37o N and longitudes 117o 40' W and 118o 30' W and the second between latitudes 37o N and 38o N and longitudes 118o W and 118o 50' W.

Sagamore Hill Radio Observatory:

Rectangle between latitudes 42o 10' N and 43o 00' N and longitudes 70o 31' W and 71o 31' W.

Table Mountain Solar Observatory (NOAA) Boulder, Colorado (407-409 MHz only)

Rectangle between latitudes 39o 30' N and 40o 30' N and longitudes 104o 30' W and 106o 00' W or the Continental Divide whichever is farther east.

The non-Government use of this band is limited to the radio astronomy service and as provided by footnote US13.

US201--In the band 460-470 MHz, space stations in the earth exploration-satellite service may be authorized for space-to-Earth transmission on a secondary basis with respect to the fixed and mobile services. When operating in the meteorological-satellite service such stations shall be protected from harmful interference from other applications of the earth exploration-satellite service. The power flux density produced at the earth's surface by any space station in this band shall not exceed 152 dBW/m2/4 kHz.

US203--Radio astronomy observations of the formaldehyde line frequencies 4825-4835 MHz and 14.470-14.500 GHz may be made at certain radio astronomy observatories as indicated below:

Bands to be
Observed	

4 GHz	14 GHz	Observatory
X		National Astronomy and Ionospher Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico
X	X	National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, West Virginia
X	X	National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, New Mexico
X	X	Hat Creek Observatory (U. of Calif.), Hat Creek, California
X	X	Haystack Radio Observatory (MIT-Lincoln Lab) Tyngsboro, Massachusetts
X	X	Owens Valley Radio Observatory (Cal. Tech.), Big Pine, California
	X	Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory, Quabbin Reservoir (near
                                 Amherst) Massachusetts

Every practicable effort will be made to avoid the assignment of frequencies to stations in the fixed or mobile services in these bands. Should such assignments result in harmful inter- ference to these observations, the situation will be remedied to the extent practicable.

US205--Tropospheric scatter systems are prohibited in the band 2500-2690 MHz.

US208--Planning and use of the band 1559- 1626.5 MHz necessitate the development of technical and/or operational sharing criteria to ensure the maximum degree of electromagnetic compatibility with existing and planned systems within the band.

US209--The use of frequencies 460.6625, 460.6875, 460.7125, 460.7375, 460.7625, 460.7875, 460.8125, 460.8375, 460.8625, 465.6625, 465.6875, 465.7125, 465.7375, 465.7625, 465.7875, 465.8125, 465.8375 and 465.8625 MHz may be authorized with 100 mW or less output power, to Government and non-Govern- ment radio stations for one-way, non-voice bio-medical telemetry operations in hospitals, or in medical or convalescent centers.

US210--Use of frequencies in the bands 40.66-40.70 and 216-220 MHz may be authorized to Government and non-Government stations on a secondary basis for the tracking of, and telemetering of scientific data from, ocean buoys and wildlife. Airborne wildlife telemetry in the 216-220 MHz band will be limited to the 216.000-216.100 MHz portion of the band. Oper- ation in these two bands is subject to the technical standards specified in (a) Section 8.2.42 of the NTIA Manual for Government use, or (b) in Section 5.108 of the Commission's Rules for non-Government.

US211--In the bands 1670-1690, 5000-5250 MHz, and 10.7-11.7, 15.1365-15.35, 15.4-15.7, 22.5-22.55, 24-24.05, 31.0-31.3, 31.8-32, 40.5-42.5, 84-86, 102-105, 116-126, 151-164, 176.5-182, 185-190, 231-235, 252-265 GHz, applicants for airborne or space station assignments are urged to take all practicable steps to protect radio astronomy observations in the adjacent bands from harmful interference; however, US74 applies.

US212--In the State of Alaska, the carrier frequency 5167.5 kHz (assigned frequency 5168.9 kHz) is designated for emergency com- munications. This frequency may also be used in the Alaska-Private Fixed Service for calling and listening, but only for establishing communica- tions before switching to another frequency. The maximum power is limited to 150 watts peak envelope power (PEP).

US213--The frequency 122.925 MHz is for use only for communications with or between aircraft when coordinating natural resources programs of Federal or State natural resources agencies, including forestry management and fire suppression, fish and game management and protection and environmental monitoring and protection.

US214--The frequency 157.100 MHz is the primary frequency for liaison communications between ship stations and stations of the United States Coast Guard.

US215--Emissions from microwave ovens manufactured on and after January 1, 1980, for operation on the frequency 915 MHz must be confined within the band 902-928 MHz. Emis- sions from microwave ovens manufactured prior to January 1, 1980, for operation on the frequency 915 MHz must be confined within the band 902-940 MHz. Radiocommunications services operating within the band 928-940 MHz must accept any harmful interference that may be experienced from the operation of microwave ovens manufactured before January 1, 1980.

US216--The frequencies 150.775 and 150.790, and the bands 152-152.0150, 163.2375-163.2625, 462.9375-463.1875, and 467.9375-468.1875 MHz are authorized for Gov- ernment/non-Government operations in medical radio communications systems.

US217--Pulse-ranging radiolocation systems may be authorized for Government and non-Government use in the 420-450 MHz band along the shorelines of Alaska and the contiguous 48 States. Spread spectrum radiolocation systems may be authorized in the 420-435 MHz portion of the band for operation within the contiguous 48 States and Alaska. Authorizations will be granted on a case-by-case basis; however, operations proposed to be located within the zones set forth in US228 should not expect to be accommodated. All stations operating in accordance with this provision will be secondary to stations operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Alloca- tions.

US218--The band 902-928 MHz is available for Location and Monitoring Service (LMS) systems subject to not causing harmful interference to the operation of all Government stations authorized in these bands. These systems must tolerate interference from the operation of industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) devices and the operation of Government stations autho- rized in these bands.

US219--In the band 2025-2110 MHz Government Earth Resources Satellite Earth Sta- tions in the Earth Exploration-Satellite Service may be authorized to use the frequency 2106.4 MHz for Earth-to-space transmissions for tracking, telemetry, and telecommand at the sites listed below. Such transmissions shall not cause harmful interference to non-Government operations:

Sioux Falls, S.D., 43 32' 03.1" N 96 45' 42.8" W.

Fairbanks, Alaska, 64 58' 36.6" N 147 30' 54.2" W.

US220--The frequencies 36.25 and 41.71 MHz may be authorized to Government stations and non-Government stations in the Petro- leum Radio Service, for oil spill containment and cleanup operations. The use of these frequencies for oil spill containment or cleanup operations is limited to the inland and coastal waterways regions.

US221--Use of the mobile service in the bands 525-535 kHz and 1605-1615 kHz is limited to distribution of public service informa- tion from Travelers Information stations operating on 530 kHz or 1610 kHz.

US222--In the band 2025-2035 MHz Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite Earth stations in the Space Research and Earth Ex- ploration-Satellite Services may be authorized on a co-equal basis to use the frequency band 2025-2035 MHz for Earth-to-space transmissions for tracking, telemetry, and telecommand at the sites listed below:

Wallops Is., Va., 37o50'48"N 75o27'33"W.

Seattle, Wa., 47o34'15"N 122o33'10"W. Honolulu, Ha., 21o21'12"N 157o52'36"W.

US223--Within 120 kilometers (75 miles) of the United States/ Canada border on the Great Lakes, the Saint Lawrence Seaway, and the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its approaches, use of coast transmit frequency 162.025 MHz and ship station transmit frequency 157.425 MHz (VHF maritime mobile service channel 88) may be authorized for use by the maritime mobile service for public correspondence.

US224--Government systems utilizing spread spectrum techniques for terrestrial communication, navigation and identification may be authorized to operate in the band 960-1215 MHz on the condition that harmful interference will not be caused to the aeronautical radionavigation service. These systems will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Such systems shall be subject to a review at the national level for operational requirements and electromagnetic compatibility prior to development, procurement or modification.

US225--In addition to its present Government use, the frequency band 510-525 kHz is available to Government and non-Government aeronautical radionavigation stations inland of the Territorial Base Line as coordinated with the military services. In addition, the frequency 510 kHz is available for non-Government ship-helicopter operations when beyond 185 kilometers (100 nautical miles) from shore and required for aeronautical radionavigation.

US226--In the State of Hawaii, stations in the aeronautical radionavigation service shall not cause harmful interference to U.S. Navy reception from its station at Honolulu on 198 kHz.

US228--Applicants of operation in the band 420 to 450 MHz under the provisions of US217 should not expect to be accommodated if their area of service is within the following geo- graphic areas:

(a) Those portions of Texas and New Mexico bounded on the south by latitude 31o 45' North, on the east by longitude 104o 00' West, on the north by latitude 34o 30' North, and on the West by longitude 107o 30' West.

(b) The entire State of Florida including the Key West area and the areas enclosed within a 322 kilometer (200-mile) radius of Patrick Air Force Base, Florida (latitude 28o 21' North, longitude 80o 43' West), and within a 322 kilometer (200-mile) radius of Eglin Air Force Base, Florida (Latitude 30o 30' North, Longitude 86o 30' West).

(c) The entire State of Arizona;

(d) Those portions of California and Nevada south of latitude 37o 10' North, and the areas enclosed within a 322 kilometer (200-mile) radius of the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California (latitude 34o 09' North, longitude 119o 11' West).

(e) In the State of Massachusetts within a 160-kilometer (100-mile) radius around locations at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts (latitude 41o 45' North, longitude 70o 32' West).

(f) In the State of California within a 240-kilometer (150-mile) radius around locations at Beale Air Force Base, California (latitude 39o 08' North, longitude 121o 26' West).

(g) In the State of Alaska within a 160 kilometer (100-mile) radius of Clear, Alaska (latitude 64 degrees, 17' North, longitude 149 degrees 10' West).

(h) In the State of North Dakota within a 160-kilometer (100-mile) radius of Concrete, North Dakota (latitude 48 degrees 43' North, longitude 97 degrees 54' West).

(i) In the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina within a 200- kilome- ter (124-mile) radius of Warner Robins Air Force Base, Georgia (latitude 32o 38' North, longitude 83o 35' West).

(j) In the State of Texas within a 200- kilometer (124-mile) radius of Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas (latitude 31o 25' North, longi- tude 100o 24' West).

US229--Assignments to stations in the fixed and mobile services may be made on the condition that no harmful interference is caused to the Navy SPASUR system currently operating in the southern United States in the frequency band 216.88-217.08 MHz.

US230--Non-government land mobile service is allocated on a primary basis in the bands 422.1875-425.4875 and 427.1875-429.9875 MHz within 80 kilometers (50 statute miles) of Detroit, MI, and Cleveland, OH, and in the bands 423.8125-425.4875 and 428.8125-429.9875 MHz within 80 kilometers (50 statute miles) of Buffalo, NY.

US231--When an assignment cannot be obtained in the bands between 200 and 525 kHz, which are allocated to Aeronautical Radio-navigation, assignments may be made to aeronautical radiobeacons in the maritime mobile band 435-490 kHz, on a secondary basis, subject to the coordination and agreement of those agencies having assignments within the maritime mobile band which may be affected. Assignments to aeronautical radionavigation radiobeacons in the band 435-490 kHz shall not be a bar to any re- quired changes to the Maritime Mobile Radio Service and shall be limited to Government not employing voice emissions.

US235--Until implementation procedures and schedules are determined by future conferences of the International Telecommunica- tion Union, the bands 9775-9900, 11650-11700, 11975-12050, 13600-13800, 15450-15600, 17550-17700 and 21750-21850 kHz to be implemented by the broadcasting service are allocated as an alternative allocation to the fixed service. The bands 12230-12330, 16360-16460, 17360-17410, 18780-18900, 19680-19800, 22720-22855, 25110-25210, and 26100-26175 kHz to be implemented by the maritime mobile service are also allocated as an alternative allocation to the fixed service until July 1, 1991, when these bands are to be allocated exclusively to the maritime mobile service.

US236--Until implementation procedures and schedules are determined by future conferences of the International Telecommunica- tion Union (see Resolution 319), the bands 4000-4063 and 8100-8195 kHz are also allocated on a primary basis to the fixed service.

US237--Until implementation procedures and schedules are determined by a future Regional Conference of the International Telecommunication Union, the band 1615-1625 kHz is also allocated on a primary basis to the radiolocation service.

US238--Until implementation procedures and schedules are determined by a future Regional Conference of the International Telecommunication Union, the band 1625-1705 kHz is allocated to the radiolocation service on a primary basis as a different category of service.

US239--Aeronautical radionavigation stations (radiobeacons) may be authorized, primarily for off-shore use, in the band 525-535 kHz on a non-interference basis to Travelers Information Stations.

US240--The bands 1715-1725 kHz and 1740-1750 kHz are allocated on a primary basis and the bands 1705-1715 kHz and 1725-1740 kHz on a secondary basis to the aeronautical radionavigation service, (radiobeacons).

US244--The band 136-137 MHz is allocated to the non-Government aeronautical mobile (R) service on a primary basis, and is subject to pertinent international treaties and agreements. The frequencies 136.000 MHz, 136.025 MHz, 136.050 MHz, 136.075 MHz, 136.125 MHz, 136.150 MHz, 136.175 MHz, 136.225 MHz, 136.250 MHz, 136.300 MHz, 136.325 MHz, 136.350 MHz, 136.400 MHz, 136.425 MHz and 136.450 MHz are available on a shared basis to the Federal Aviation Administration for air traffic control purposes, such as automatic weather observation services, automatic terminal information services and airport control tower communications. Stations licensed prior to January 2, 1990, using the 136-137 MHz band for space operations (space-to-Earth), meteorological-satellite service (space-to-Earth), and the space research service (space-to-Earth) may continue to use this band on a second- ary basis to aeronautical mobile (R) service stations. No new assignments will be made to stations in the above space services.

US245--The Fixed-Satellite Service is limited to International inter-Continental systems and subject to case-by-case electromagnetic compatibility analysis.

US246--No stations will be authorized to transmit in the bands 608-614 MHz, 1400-1427 MHz, 1660.5-1668.4 MHz, 2690-2700 MHz, 4990-5000 MHz, 10.68-10.70 GHz, 15.35-15.40 GHz, 23.6-24.0 GHz, 31.3-31.8 GHz, 51.4-54.25 GHz, 58.2-59.0 GHz, 64-65 GHz, 86-92 GHz, 100-102 GHz, 105-116 GHz, 164-168 GHz, 182-185 GHz and 217-231 GHz.

US247--The band 10100-10150 kHz is allocated to the fixed service on a primary basis outside the United States and Possessions. Transmissions of stations in the amateur service shall not cause harmful interference to this fixed service use and stations in the amateur service shall make all necessary adjustments (including termination of transmission) if harmful inter- ference is caused.

US251--The band 12.75-13.25 GHz is also allocated to the Space Research Service (Deep Space) (space-to-Earth) for reception only at Goldstone, California. 35o18'N 116o54'W.

US252--The bands 2110-2120 and 7145-7190 MHz, 34.2-34.7 GHz are also allocated for Earth-to-space transmissions in the Space Research Service, limited to deep space communications at Goldstone, California.

US253--In the band 2300-2310 MHz, the fixed and mobile services shall not cause harmful interference to the amateur service.

US254--In the band 18.6-18.8 GHz, the fixed and mobile services shall be limited to a maximum equivalent isotopically radiated power of +35 dBw and the power delivered to the antenna shall not exceed 3 dBw.

US255--In the band 18.6-18.8 GHz, the fixed- satellite service shall be limited to a power flux density at the Earth's surface of 101 dbW/M2 in a 200 MHz band for all angles of arrival.

US256--Radio astronomy observations may be made in the band 1718.8-1722.2 MHz on an unprotected basis. Agencies providing other services in this band in the geographic areas listed below should bear in mind that their operations may affect those obser- vations, and those agencies are encouraged to minimize potential interference to the observations insofar as it is practicable.

Hat Creek Observatory Hat	Rectangle between latitudes 40 00'N and 42 00'N 
Creek, California		and between latitudes 120 15'W and 122 15'W.

Owens Valley Radio	Two contiguous rectangles, one between 36 00'N and 37 00'N and
Observatory		between longitudes 117 40'W and 118 30'W and the second between 
Big Pine,      		latitudes 37 00N and 30 00'N and between longitudes 118 00'W and
California    		118 50'W. 

Haystack Radio		Rectangle between latitudes 41 00'N and 43 00'N and 
Observatory		between longitudes 71 00'W and 73 00'W.
Tyngsboro,
Massachusetts

National Astronomy	Rectangle between latitudes 17 30'N and 19 00'N and between 
and Ionosphere		longitudes 65 10'W and 68 00'W.
Center
Arecibo, Puerto Rico
	
National Radio		Rectangle between latitudes 37 30'N and 39 15'N and
Astronomy		between longitudes 78 30'W and 80 30'W.
Observatory
Green Bank, West
Virginia 	 

US257--Radio astronomy observations may be made in the 4950-4990 MHz band at certain Radio Astronomy Observatories indicated below:

National Astronomy and Ionosphere	Rectangle between Latitudes 17 30"n and 19 00'N and between
Center Arecibo, Puerto Rico		latitudes 65 10'W and 68 00'W.

Haystack Radio Observatory		Rectangle between latitudes 41 00'N and 43 00'N and
Tyngsboro, Massachusetts		between longitudes 71 00'W and 73 00'W.

National Radio Astronomy		Rectangle between latitudes 37 00N and 39 15'N and between
Observatory Green Bank, 		longitudes 78 30'Nand 80 30'W.
West Virginia

National Radio Astronomy		Rectangle between latitudes 32 30'N and 35 30'N and between
Observatory Socorro, New Mexico		longitudes 106 00'W and 109 00'W.

Owens Valley Radio  Observatory		Two contiguous rectangles, one between latitudes
Big Pine, California			36 00'N and 37 00'N and between longitudes 117 40'W 
					and 118 30'W and the  second between latitudes
					37 00'N  and 38 00N
					and between longitudes 118 00'W and 118 50'W.

Hat Creek Observatory Hat Creek,	Rectangle between latitudes 40 00'N  and 42 00,N and between
California				longitudes 120 15'W and 122 15'W.

Every practicable effort will be made to avoid the assignment of frequencies in the band 4950-4990 MHz to stations in the fixed and mobile services within the geographic areas given above. In addition, every practicable effort will be made to avoid the assignment of frequencies in this band to stations in the aeronautical mobile service which operate outside of those geographic areas, but which may cause harmful interference to the listed observatories. Should such assign- ments result in harmful interference to these observatories, the situation will be remedied to the extent practicable.

US258--In the band 8025-8400 MHz, the non-Government earth exploration-satellite service (space-to-Earth) is allocated on a primary basis. Authorizations are subject to a case-by-case electromagnetic compatibility analysis.

US259--Stations in the radiolocation service in the band 17.3-17.7 GHz, shall be restricted to operating powers of less than 51 dBw eirp after feeder link stations for the broadcasting-satellite service are authorized and brought into use.

US260--Aeronautical mobile communications which are an integral part of aeronautical radionavigation systems may be satisfied in the bands 1559-1626.5 MHz, 5000-5250 MHz and 15.4-15.7 GHz.

US261--The use of the band 4200-4400 MHz by the Aeronautical Radionavigation service is reserved exclusively for airborne radio altimeters. Experimental stations will not be authorized to develop equipment for operational use in this band other than equipment related to altimeter stations. However, passive sensing in the Earth Exploration-Satellite and Space Research services may be authorized in this band on a secondary basis (no protection is provided from the radio altimeters).

US262--The band 31.8-32.3 GHz is also allocated for space-to-Earth transmissions in the Space Research Service, limited to deep space communications at Goldstone, California.

US263--In the frequency bands 21.2-21.4, 22.21-22.5, 36-37, 50.2-50.4, 54.25-58.2, 116-126, 150-151, 174.5-176.5, 200-202 and 235-238 GHz, the Space Research and the Earth Exploration-Satellite Services shall not receive protection from the Fixed and Mobile Services operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.

US264--In the band 48.94-49.04 GHz, airborne stations shall not be authorized.

US265--In the band 10.6-10.68 GHz, the fixed service shall be limited to a maximum equivalent isotopically radiated power of 40 dBW and the power delivered to the antenna shall not exceed 3 dBW, per 250 kHz.

US266--Licensees in the Public Safety Radio Services holding a valid authorization on June 30, 1958, to operate in the frequency band 156.27-157.47 MHz or on the frequencies of 161.85, 161.91 or 161.97 MHz may, upon proper application, continue to be authorized for such operation, including expansion of existing systems, until such time as harmful interference is caused to the operation of any authorized station other than those licensed in the Public Safety Radio Service.

US267--In the band 902-928 MHz, amateur radio stations shall not operate within the States of Colorado and Wyoming, bounded by the area of: latitude 39 N to 42 N and longitude 103 W to 108o W.

US268--The bands 890-902 MHz and 928-942 MHz are also allocated to the radiolocation service for Government ship stations (off-shore ocean areas) on the condition that harm- ful interference is not caused to non-Government land mobile stations. The provisions of footnote US116 apply.

US269--In the band 2500-2690 MHz, applicants for space station assignments are urged to take all practicable steps to protect radio astronomy observations in the adjacent band, 2690-2700 MHz, from harmful interference. Further, all applicants are urged to coordinate their proposed systems through the Electromag- netic Spectrum Management Unit, National Sci- ence Foundation, Washington, D.C. 20550, prior to systems development.

US270--The band 72.77-72.91 GHz is also allocated to the radio astronomy service. Applicants for frequency assignments in this band are urged to take all practicable steps to protect radio astronomy observations from harmful interference.

US271--The use of the band 17.3-17.8 GHz by the Fixed-Satellite Service (Earth-to-space) is limited to feeder links for Broadcasting-Satellite Service.

US272--The allocation to the Maritime Mobile-Satellite Service in the band 1530-1535 MHz shall be effective from 1 January 1990. Up to that date the allocation to the Mobile Service will be on a primary basis.

US273--In the 74.6-74.8 MHz and 75.2-75.4 MHz bands, stations in the fixed and mobile services are limited to a maximum power of 1 watt from the transmitter into the antenna transmission line.

US274--In the 216-220 MHz band, fixed, aeronautical mobile, and land mobile stations are limited to telemetering and associated telecommand operations.

US275--The band 902-928 MHz is allocated on a secondary basis to the amateur service subject to not causing harmful interference to the operations of Government stations authorized in this band or to Location and Monitoring Service (LMS) systems. Stations in the Amateur service must tolerate any interference from the operations of industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) devices, LMS systems, and the operations of Government stations authorized in this band. Further, the Amateur Service is pro- hibited in those portions of Texas and New Mexico bounded on the south by latitude 31 41' North, on the east by longitude 104 11' West, on the north by latitude 34 30' North, and on the west by longitude 107 30' West; in addition, outside this area but within 240 kilometers (150 miles) of these boundaries of White Sands Missile Range the service is restricted to a maximum transmitter peak envelope power output of 50 watts.

US276--Except as otherwise provided for herein, use of the band 2310-2390 MHz by the mobile service is limited to aeronauti- cal telemetering and associated telecommand oper- ations for flight testing of manned or unmanned aircraft, missiles or major components thereof. The following six frequencies are shared on a co-equal basis by Government and non-Government stations for telemetering and associated telecommand operations of expendable and re-usable launch vehicles whether or not such opera- tions involve flight testing: 2312.5, 2332.5, 235- 2.5, 2364.5, 2370.5, and 2382.5 MHz. All other mobile telemetering uses shall be secondary to the above uses.

US277--The band 10.6-10.68 GHz is also allocated on a primary basis to the radio astronomy service. However, the radio astronomy service shall not receive protection from stations in the Fixed Service which are licensed to operate in the one hundred most populous urbanized areas as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. The following radio astronomy sites have been coordinated for observations in this band: National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, West Virginia (38 26 08N; 79 49 42W); National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, New Mexico (34 04 43N; 107 37 04W); Harvard Radio Astronomy Station, Fort Davis, Texas 30 38 08N; 103 56 42W); Hat Creek Observatory, Hat Creek, California (40 49 03N; 121 28 24W); Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, California (37 13 54N; 118 17 36W); Naval Research Laboratory, Maryland Point, Maryland (38 22 26N; 77 14 00W).

US278--In the 22.55-23.55 and 32-33 GHz bands, non-geostationary inter-satellite links may operate on a secondary basis to geosta- tionary inter-satellite links.

US279--The frequency 2182 kHz may be authorized to fixed stations associated with the maritime mobile service for the sole purpose of transmitting distress calls and distress traffic, and urgency and safety signals and messages.

US281--In the band 25.07-25.11 MHz, non-Government stations in the Industrial Radio Services shall not cause harmful interfer- ence to, and must accept interference from, stations in the Maritime Mobile Service operating in accordance with the International Table of Frequency Allocations.

US282--In the band 4650-4700 kHz, frequencies may be authorized for non-Government communication with helicopters in support of off-shore drilling operations on the condition that harmful interference will not be caused to services operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.

US283--In the bands 2850-3025 kHz, 3400-3500 kHz, 4650-4700 kHz, 5450-5680 kHz, 6525-6685 kHz, 10005-10100 kHz, 11275-11400 kHz, 13260-13360 kHz and 17900-17970 kHz frequencies in these bands may be authorized for non-Government flight test purposes on the condition that harmful interference will not be caused to services operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.

US284--Until July 1, 1991, the carrier frequencies 6451.9 and 6455.0 kHz may be authorized to non-Government ship telephone and coast telephone stations operating in the Mississippi River maritime mobile service system on the condition that harmful interference will not be caused to services operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations and that any interference from such services must be accepted.

US285--Under exceptional circumstances, the carrier frequencies 2635, 2638, and 2738 kHz may be authorized to coast stations.

US287--The band 14-14.5 GHz is also allocated to the non-Government land mobile-satellite service (Earth-to-space) on a secondary basis.

US290--In the band 1900-2000 kHz, amateur stations may continue to operate on a sec- ondary basis to the Radiolocation Service, pending a decision as to their disposition through a future rule making proceeding in conjunction with implementation of the Standard Broadcasting Service in the 1625-1705 kHz band.

US291--Television pickup stations in the mobile service may be authorized to use frequencies in the band 38.6-40 GHz on a secondary basis to stations operating in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.

US292--In the band 14.0-14.2 GHz stations in the radionavigation service shall operate on a secondary basis to the fixed-satellite service.

US294--In the spectrum below 490 kHz electric utilities operate Power Line Carrier (PLC) systems on power transmission lines for communications important to the reliability and security of electric service to the public. These PLC systems operate under the provisions of Part 15 of the Federal Communication Commission's Rules and Regulations or Chapter 7 of the Na- tional Telecommunications and Information Administration's Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Man- agement, on an unprotected and noninterference basis with respect to authorized radio users. Noti- fication of intent to place new or revised radio frequency assignments or PLC frequency uses in the bands below 490 kHz is to be made in accor- dance with the Rules and Regulations of the FCC and NTIA, and users are urged to minimize poten- tial interference to the degree practicable. This footnote does not provide any allocation status to PLC radio frequency uses.

US296--Until July 1, 1991, in the bands designated for ship wideband telegraphy, facsimile and special transmission systems, the following assignable frequencies are available to non-Government stations on a shared basis with Government stations: 2070.5, 2072.5, 2074.5, 2076.5, 4160.5, 4168, 6238.6, 6242.6, 8326, 8341.5, 12485, 12489, 16654, 16658, 22186, and 22190 kHz.

Effective July 1, 1991, in the bands designated for ship wide-band telegraphy, facsimile and special transmission systems, the following assignable frequencies are available to non-Gov- ernment stations on a shared basis with Govern- ment stations: 2070.5, 2072.5, 2074.5, 2076.5, 4154, 4170, 6235, 6259, 8302, 8338, 12370, 12418, 16551, 16615, 18848, 18868, 22182, 22238, 25123, and 25159 kHz.

US297--The bands 47.2-49.2 GHz and 74.0-75.5 GHz are also available for feeder links for the broadcasting-satellite service.

US298--Channels 27555, 27615, 27635, 27655, 27765, and 27860 KHz are available to eligibles in the Forest Products Radio Service on a secondary basis to Government operations including experimental stations. Operations in the Forest Products Radio Service on these channels will not exceed 150 watts and are limited to the states of Washington, Oregon, Maine, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennes- see, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas (eastern portion).

US299--Until implementation procedures and schedules are determined by a future Regional Conference of the International Telecommunication Union the frequency bands 1615-1625 and 1625-1705 kHz in Alaska are also allocated to the maritime mobile services and the Alaska fixed service.

US300--The frequencies 169.445, 169.505, 170.245, 170.305, 171.045, 171.105, 171.845 and 171.905 MHz are available for wire- less microphone operations on a secondary basis to Government and non-Government operations.

US301--Except as provided in US302, broadcast auxiliary stations licensed as of November 21, 1984, to operate in the band 942-944 MHz may continue to operate on a co-equal primary basis to other stations and services operat- ing in the band in accordance with the Table of Frequency Allocations.

US302--The band 942-944 MHz in Puerto Rico is allocated as an alternative allocation to the fixed service for broadcast auxiliary stations only.

US303--In the band 2285-2290 MHz, non-Government space stations in the space research, space operations and earth exploration-satellite services may be authorized to transmit to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System subject to such conditions as may be applied on a case-by-case basis. Such transmissions shall not cause harmful interference to authorized Gov- ernment stations. The power flux density at the Earth's surface from such non-Government stations shall not exceed 144 to 154 dBW/m2/4 kHz, depending on angle of arrival, in accordance with ITU Radio Regulation 2557.

US307--The sub-band 5150-5216 MHz is also allocated for space-to-Earth transmissions in the fixed-satellite service for feeder links in conjunction with the radiodetermi- nation-satellite service operating in the bands 1610-1626.5 MHz and 2483.5-2500 MHz. The total power flux density at the earth's surface shall in no case exceed 159 dBW/m2 per 4 KHz for all angles of arrival.

US308--In the frequency bands 1549.5-1558.5 MHz and 1651-1660 MHz, the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) requirements that cannot be accommodated in the 1545-1549.5 MHz, 1558.5-1559 MHz, 1646.5-1651 MHz and 1660-1660.5 MHz bands shall have priority access with real-time preemptive capability for communications in the mobile-satellite service. Systems not interoperable with the aeronautical mobile-satellite (R) service shall operate on a secondary basis. Account shall be taken of the priority of safety-related communications in the mobile-satellite service.

US309--Transmissions in the bands 1545-1559 MHz from terrestrial aeronautical stations directly to aircraft stations, or between aircraft stations, in the aeronautical mobile (R) service are also authorized when such trans- missions are used to extend or supplement the satellite-to-aircraft links. Transmissions in the band 1646.5-1660.5 MHZ from aircraft stations in the aeronautical mobile (R) service directly to terrestrial aeronautical stations, or between aircraft stations, are also authorized when such transmis- sions are used to extend or supplement the aircraft-to-satellite links.

US310--In the band 14.896-15.121 GHz, non-Government space stations in the space research service may be authorized on a secondary basis to transmit to Tracking and Data Relay Satellites subject to such conditions as may be applied on a case-by-case basis. Such transmissions shall not cause harmful interference to authorized Government stations. The power flux density at the earth's surface from such non-Government stations shall not exceed 138 to 148 dBW/m2/4kHz, depending on the angle of arrival, in accordance with CCIR Recom- mendation 510-1.

US311--Radio astronomy observations may be made in the 1350-1400 MHz band on an unprotected basis at certain Radio Astronomy Observatories indicated below:

National Astronomy	Rectangle between latitudes 17  30'N and 19 00'N and between
and Ionosphere		longitudes 65 10'W and 68 00'W.
Center
Arecibo, Puerto Rico

National Radio		Rectangle between latitudes 32 30'N and 35 30'N and between
Astronomy		longitudes 106 00'W and 109  00'W.
Observatory
Socorro, New Mexico
	 
National Radio		Rectangle between latitudes 37  30'N and 39 15'N and
Astronomy		between longitudes 78 30'W and 80 30'W.
Observatory
Green Bank, West
Virginia

National Radio Astro-
  nomy Observatory	80 kilometers (50 mile)  radius centered on:
Very Long Baseline
  Array Stations	Latitude 	Longitude 
			(North)		(West)
Pie Town, NM		34 18		108 07'
Kitt Peak, AZ		31 57		111 37'
Los Alamos, NM		35 47		106 15'
Fort Davis, TX		30 38		103 57'
North Liberty, IA	41 46		91 34'
Brewster, WA		48 08		119 41
Owens Valley, CA	37 14		118 17'
Saint Croix, VI		17 46		64 35'
Mauna Kea, HI		19 48		155 27'
Hancock, NH		42 56		71 59'

Every practicable effort will be made to avoid the assignment of frequencies in the band 1350-1400 MHz to stations in the fixed and mobile services which could interfere with radio astronomy observations within the geographic areas given above. In addition, every practicable effort will be made to avoid assignment of fre- quencies in this band to stations in the aeronautical mobile service which operate outside of those geographic areas, but which may cause harmful interference to the listed observatories. Should such assignments result in harmful interference to these observatories, the situation will be remedied to the extent practicable.

US312--The frequency 173.075 MHz may also be authorized on a primary basis to non-Government stations in the Police Radio Service (with a maximum authorized bandwidth of 20 kHz) for stolen vehicle recovery systems.

US315--In the frequency bands 1530-1544 MHz and 1626.5-1645.5 MHz maritime mobile-satellite distress and safety communications, e.g., GMDSS, shall have priority access with real-time preemptive capability in the mobile-satellite service. Communications of mobile-satellite system stations not participating in the GMDSS shall operate on a secondary basis to distress and safety communications of stations operating in the GMDSS. Account shall be taken of the priority of safety-related communications in the mobile-satellite service.

US316--The band 2900-3000 MHz is also allocated on a primary basis to the Meteorological Aids Service. Operations in this service are limited to Government Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) systems where accommodation in the 2700-2900 MHz band is not technically practical and are subject to coordination with existing authorized stations.

US317--The band 218.0-219.0 MHz is allocated on a primary basis to the Interactive Video and Data Operations.

US318--Until January 1, 2000, the use of the 137-138 MHz band by the mobile-satellite service will be secondary to Government operations within the subbands: 137.333-137.367, 137.485-137.515, 137.605-137.635 and 137.753-137.787 MHz.

US319--In the 137-138, 148-149.9, 149.9-150.05, 399.9-400.05, 400.15-401, 1610-1626.5, and 2483.5-2500 MHz bands, Govern- ment stations in the mobile-satellite service shall be limited to earth stations operating with non-Government space stations.

US320--Use of the 137-138, 148-149.9, and 400.15-401 MHz bands by the mobile-satellite service is limited to non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems and may include satellite links between land earth stations at fixed locations.

US322--The 149.9-150.05 MHz band is allocated to the mobile-satellite service (Earth-to-space) on a primary basis after January 1, 1997 and shall be limited to non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems, including satellite links between land earth stations. Before January 1, 1997 use of this band on a secondary basis for the mobile satellite service is allowed for land earth stations at fixed locations.

US323--In the 148-149.9 MHz band, no individual mobile earth station shall transmit, on the same frequency being actively used by fixed and mobile stations and shall transmit no more than 1% of the time during any 15 minute period; except, individual mobile earth stations in this band that do not avoid frequencies actively being used by the fixed and mobile services shall not exceed a power density of -16 dBW/4kHz and shall transmit no more than 0.25% of the time during any 15 minute period. Any single transmission from any individual mobile earth station operating in this band shall not exceed 450 ms in duration and consecutive transmissions from a single mobile earth station on the same frequency shall be separated by at least 15 seconds. Land earth stations in this band shall be subject to electromagnetic compatibility analysis and coordination with fixed and mobile stations.

US324--Government and non-Government satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band shall be subject to electromagnetic compatibility analysis and coordination.

US325--In the band 148-149.9 MHz fixed and mobile stations shall not claim protection from land earth stations in the mobile-satellite service that have been previously coordi- nated; Government fixed and mobile stations exceeding 27 dBW EIRP, or an emission bandwidth greater than 38 kHz, will be coordi- nated with existing mobile-satellite service space stations.

US326--The 399.9-400.05 MHz band is allocated to the mobile-satellite service (Earth-to-space) on a primary basis after January 1, 1997 and shall be limited to non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems, including satellite links between land earth stations.

US327--The band 2310-2360 MHZ is allocated to the broadcasting-satellite service (sound) and complementary terrestrial broadcasting service on a primary basis. Such use is limited to digital audio broadcasting and is subject to the provisions of Resolution 528.

US328--In the band 2310-2360 MHZ, the mobile and radiolocation services are allocated on a primary basis until 1 January 1997 or until broadcasting-satellite (sound) service has been brought into use in such a manner as to affect or be affected by the mobile and radiolocation services in those service areas, whichever is later. The broadcasting-satellite (sound) service during implementation should also take cognizance of the expendable and reusable launch vehicle frequencies 2312.5, 2332.5, and 2352.5 MHZ, to minimize the impact on this mobile service use to the extent possible.

US331--In the frequency band 1850-1990 MHz, the only fixed PCS services permitted are ancillary ser-vices used in support of mobile personal commun-ications services.

US334--In the band 17.8-20.2 GHz, Government space stations and associated earth stations in the fixed-satellite (space-to-Earth) service may be autho-rized on a primary basis. For a Government geo-stationary satellite network to operate on a primary basis, the space station shall be located outside the arc measured from East to West, 70 W to 120 W. Coordination between Government fixed-satellite systems and non-Government systems operating in accordance with the United States Table of Frequency Allocations is required.



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